VENEZUELA: Can President Maduro act like a statesman?

venezuela protest

 

 

VENEZUELA:  Can President Maduro act like a statesman?

 

Joei R. Deeb, CEO, www.omegaworldnews.com

International Security Analyst

September 4, 2016

 

Venezuela is going the way of the former Soviet Union.  The oil-rich country is imploding before our very eyes, following the destruction of its once vibrant national economy during the past seventeen years of mismanagement by extremist ideologues of the political left, namely the late president Hugo Chavez and his successor Nicolas Maduro, a former bus driver.

Not only has the communist Bolivarian government of Venezuela failed to diversify the nation’s oil based economy, its pricing fixing activities in most markets have created significant distortions that have led to widespread shortages of food and other basic necessities.  Skyrocketing prices have made it impossible for most Venezuelans in the middle class to satisfy their economic needs.  Store shelves are empty.  Even toilet paper is hard to find.  All Venezuelans, including the rich, feel the pinch and many are now in self-imposed exile in foreign nations.  South Florida in the United States is now home to a large number of well educated professionals, intellectuals, journalists and members of the business elite of Venezuela.

The current crisis began roughly two years ago when angry university students took to the streets of Caracas to protest a hike in the price of public transportation.  Soon after, important democratic political leaders joined in, many of whom have since suffered egregious political persecution, including Enrique Capriles and Leopoldo Eduardo Lopez Mendoza.  Impartial students of Venezuela’s politics affirm that, by most metrics, the current crisis is far worse than those of 1895 and 1902.  Today’s crisis is strictly domestic, resulting from the mismanagement of the nation’s economic wealth, as is exemplified by the PETROCARIBE program that serves as a platform for the corruption practiced by high level members of the country’s communist government.

The democratic opposition to the increasingly brutal government of Mr. Maduro, has called for a democratic recall of the president’s election.  Just a couple of days ago, the nation’s powerful Catholic Church lends its support behind the Recall Movement after Archbishop Diego Padrón Sánchez of Cumaná, president of the Venezuelan bishops’ conference, denounced a government afflicted with “chronic hearing disorder” that prevents it from being attentive to the unmet needs of the people of Venezuela.

Slaves to the erroneous principles of communism, the Maduro government so far remains oblivious to the lessons of recent history about the likely outcomes of public policies relying on the brute force of dictatorships.  How long will military leaders remain insensitive to the plight of the people of Venezuela?  To avoid total chaos and the worse miseries of a failed state as would say our resident economist and my associate, Prof. Parnell Duverger, a peaceful solution must be found that will come only from Venezuelans statesmen and women.  The question is:  can Mr. Maduro be such a statesman to relinquish power and facilitate a democratic transition?

 

 

Joei R. Deeb, CEO,

International Security Analyst

September 4, 2016

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Courtesy Euro  News

 

Courtesy News Tuber

 

 

 

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